Stories and More: Music is for Everyone!

8 Aug

Yeah, I’m a few months behind in posting these. But here’s what we did for Stories and More in December – and BOY was it fun. Can you say MUSICAL INSTRUMENT PETTING ZOO??

FOCUS: SINGING!

Singing and music help build many early literacy skills. Singing helps a child better hear the smaller sounds that make up words – which helps with sounding out words. They also learn about rhyming and vocabulary. Plus, singing leads to dancing and moving, which, as we know, is a great way for young kids to learn. They need to use their whole bodies!

Storytime plan:

Opening song: Hello and How Are You?

Hello, hello, hello and how are you?

I’m fine, I’m fine, I hope that you are too!

Introductions and Early Literacy Reminder: Singing is a great way for children to develop lots of pre-reading skills! It breaks words up so that they can hear the smaller sounds in them. It also helps with memory and grows vocabulary! So let’s sing!

Rhyme: Wake Up Toes

Wake Up Toes, wake up toes, wake up toes and wiggle, wiggle wiggle.

Wake up toes, wake up toes, wake up and wiggle in the morning!

jazz baby

Ask for suggestions for more body parts to wake up!

Book: Jazz Baby by Lisa Wheeler – this is a great story with a beat! The kids and caregivers can help out!

Shaker Egg Song: Can you shake your egg with me?

[Tune: London Bridges]

Can you shake your egg with me? It’s as easy as can be

Shake your egg along with me. Now put it on your…TUMMY!

Continue with other body parts!

Shaker Egg Song: “I Know a Chicken” by Laurie Berkner

Settling Rhyme: 1 Little Fish

One little fish is swimming in the water (put palms together and zig zag like a fish swimming)

Swimming in the water,

Swimming in the water,

One little fish is swimming in the water,

Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble, POP! (raise hands and clap together on POP!)

seals

 

Book: Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort

 

Early Literacy Reminder: This book is sung to a familiar tune – but with a twist! You can take a familiar song and change the words to be about anything you want – like a daily routine! Sing while you brush teeth, put on clothes – anytime!

Flannelboard: Brown Bear, Brown Bear (sung to the tune of “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”)

Song: “If You’re Happy and You Know It”

Goodbye Rhyme: Our Hands Say Thank You

Our hands say thank you with a clap, clap, clap

And our feet say thank you with a tap, tap, tap.

Clap clap clap,

Tap, tap, tap,

Turn around and take a bow.

Early Literacy Play Activities:

 

As promised: MUSICAL INSTRUMENT PETTING ZOO! The kids tried out a bunch of different instruments (including my ukulele – I took a gamble and it paid off ; they were great with it!). My boyfriend had recently given me a set of bongos and we loved that. Otherwise, we used rhythm instruments (sticks, bells, sand blocks), this set of Melissa and Doug instruments, a mini accordion, a mini glockenspiel (I LOVE SAYING GLOCKENSPIEL), and a set of toddler/baby instruments so the littlest ones could join in too. We made a TON of noise which was great but in case any of the children attending had sensory challenges I had a couple pair of noise-reducing headphones on hand in case of need.

Also, we had a dance party. While the music got a bit drowned out by the instruments, if anyone was interested in dancing while playing I had this soundtrack going.

Take-homes:

happyBooks: We took home books that had to do with music or could be sung. Babies got Toot! Toot! Guess the Instrument. Toddlers took home If You’re Happy and You Know It  (the Jane Cabrera version, which is my favorite). Preschoolers got Seals on the Bus.

Activities: Babies took home one of these Feely Fish (they don’t seem to be available anymore), which I suggested caregivers use while singing “1 Little Fish” at home. Toddlers and preschoolers got wrist ribbons to use while dancing.

Here is the handout that went in the bags and includes more information on the books and activities and how to use them, plus additional ideas for home.

I hope this is useful! Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

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