#PB10for10: My Favorite Everyday Diversity Books

10 Aug

Hi! It’s August 10 and apparently (this is new to me today) that means it’s 10 for 10 day – pb 10 for 10 01510 picture books on August 10! I just learned about this today but it’s been going on for several years – organized by Mandy Robeck and Cathy Mere. Wanna join in? Here are the “rules“.

I thought I’d share 10 of my favorite “everyday diversity” books. What’s everyday diversity? Well according to my friend Anna who writes the amazing Everyday Diversity blog, books that feature everyday diversity are “books that predominantly feature People of Color and Native Americans as main characters in contemporary everyday life.” These are books that don’t deal with issues such as racism, religion, “other cultures”, etc., but are simply about children being children and doing what children do. These characters could be (and are!) children anywhere.

These are some of my faves. There are certainly more, but I had to stick to 10!

#PB10FOR10Favorite Everyday Diversity Picture BooksMissMaryLiberry.com

Lola Loves Stories by Anna McQuinnlola

I love ALL the Lola and Leo stories. Lola is a little girl who loves to go to the library, readstories, and play with her friends. The books are toddler-friendly and great for storytime. And – I once gave one of the Lola books away to a little girl who looked EXACTLY like Lola. When the girl was choosing her book, she saw Lola on the cover, pointed at it, and said in a reverent voice, “I want THAT one.” Representation matters.max

Max Speed! by Stephen Shaksan

Max may be my new favorite daredevil! Max faces all kinds of challenges but faces them with bravery and pluck.

rhythm

I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison; Illustrated by Frank Morrison

A little girl hops and bops and dances all the way to the park while others join in. A great storytime selection with a beat!

Marta! Big and Small by Jen Arenas; Illustrated by Angela M. Dominguezmarta

Marta compares herself to different animals in this happy opposites books. Spanish words are introduced with their English counterparts and we learn adjectives and animal names. A great toddler or preschooler choice.

One Family by George Shannon; illustrated by Blanca Gomezfamily

Multiple configurations – including grandparents, biracial caregivers, same-sex caregivers, different religions (I’m saying caregivers rather than parents because I don’t know their relationship to the child – only that they are caring for the child) – each make up ONE family. The first picture book in which I saw a Sikh family represented.

Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood by F. Isabel maybeCampoy; Illustrated by Rafael López

Mira, a young artist, is inspired by a local muralist to enlist the community to transform her neighborhood into “something beautiful.” The illustrations – by the muralist who inspired the story – are especially eye-catching.

We Love You, Rosie! by Cynthia Rylant; Illustrated by Linda Davickrosie

Rosie the dog is sometimes in, sometimes out. She’s sometimes bad, and sometimes good. But she’s always, always loved. This is a sweet introduction to opposites suitable for toddlers.

heart

My Heart Fills With Happiness by Monique Grey Smith; Illustrated by Julie Flett

This is a beautiful, warm board book reminding us of the many things that makeus happy, including holding the hand of someone we love. A great title to share in baby storytime (or give as baby shower gifts!)

Maggie and Michael Get Dressed by Denise Flemingmaggie

Michael and his dog Maggie attempt to get dressed in the morning – but Maggie wants to put everything on wrong! This toddler-friendly book looks at colors and body parts in a playful way.

Bob, Not Bob! by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick; Illustrated by Matthew Cordellbob

The instructions at the top of this 2017 title say this is “to be read as though you have the worst cold ever.” When you read it aloud in such a way, calling for you MOM sounds exactly like you’re calling for your dog, who happens to be named BOB. This is a silly read-aloud that every child will relate to.

These are but a few of the growing (but not big enough!) body of picture books featuring diverse kids doing things that kids do. I’m glad the publishing world is taking notice, but there’s still a long way to go.

What are your favorites? Check out the twitter hashtag #PB10for10 to see more great lists and suggestions!

9 Responses to “#PB10for10: My Favorite Everyday Diversity Books”

  1. missmaryliberry August 11, 2017 at 1:24 pm #

    Puddle was #11! 🙂

  2. Jane the Raincity Librarian August 11, 2017 at 12:30 pm #

    OH! And “Excellent Ed” by Stacy McAnulty and “Puddle” by Hyewon Yum!

  3. Jane the Raincity Librarian August 11, 2017 at 12:28 pm #

    Such a great list! I love “Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin”, which has a young Japanese American protagonist, and absolutely adorable illustrations. 🙂

  4. tflander2015 August 11, 2017 at 12:23 pm #

    Thanks for your recommendations. I’ll look into getting Max Speed for the Doucette Library’s collection.
    Tammy
    Apples with Many Seeds

  5. Catht August 11, 2017 at 6:33 am #

    That sure filled up my library card! #goodproblems. Thank you for so many great recommendations. I can’t wait to check them out.

  6. Sandi August 11, 2017 at 12:36 am #

    Thank you for this list. I want my classroom library to reflect diversity – but don’t want every book that portrays characters from visible minorities and and characters from different kinds of families to have to have a “message”.

  7. carriegelson August 10, 2017 at 10:54 pm #

    Maybe Something Beautiful is one of my favourites! And I also adore this board book by Julie Flett. Wonderful list!

  8. Stacey Shubitz August 10, 2017 at 8:32 pm #

    My daughter ADORES Maybe Something Beautiful. I’ve read it to her close to 100 times!

    Most of the other titles are fresh for me. I cannot wait to check them out. Thank you for such a robust list of titles that are new (to me).

  9. Lori Sabo August 10, 2017 at 8:28 pm #

    Some new titles for me. Can’t wait to read them.

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