Tag Archives: Bugs

Flannel Friday: Bug Board

16 Mar

After a week’s hiatus, I’m glad to be back with a VERY simple board idea for y’all.

A few weeks ago, I found myself browsing the $1 bins at Target (as I am wont to do ) and I discovered bags of plastic bugs. This was fortuitous, as the timing coincided perfectly with my annual bug storytime. I picked up a couple (each had different bugs) and decided what to do with them.

I put a small piece of velcro on the back of each:

I made a felt/paint label for each bug.

I told the kids we were going to figure out what the bugs are, and then put their names with them. I keep the bugs hidden and give them clues to guess what they are:

  • Likes to visit picnics. Is small, sometimes black, and sometimes red (ANT)
  • Makes honey (BEE)
  • Hops; is long and green (GRASSHOPPER)
  • Flies around our houses in summer, bothers us, and lands on our food (FLY)
  • Is long and green and arms sometimes go together like this [praying motion] (PRAYING MANTIS)
  • Flies around the water; has long skinny body and wide wings. Sometimes blue. (DRAGONFLY)
  • Has eight legs (SPIDER)
  • Red with black spots (LADYBUG)
  • Lives where it’s hot; has pinchers and a long tail with a stinger on it (SCORPION)

They don’t always guess all of them, but they guessed many. I did have a few kids who were able to guess the harder ones, even!

When we’ve guessed, we put the bug on the board and add it’s name. This was a great print recognition/awareness activity as we talked about which names were longer, which had only 3 letters (Bee, Fly, Ant) and how Praying Mantis has two words in its name. I run my finger under the words from left to right. Several kids commented on first letters (“Hey! That B is my name!”).

In short, this was a fun, easy-to-make activity that the kids really seemed to enjoy. The moral of the story? ALWAYS check the Target dollar bins.

Today’s Flannel Friday roundup is being hosted by Angela at Valley Storytime. Check it out for all the flannel-y goodness! All past flannels are pinned on pinterest (click the felt words to the right) and all of MY past posts can be found under the tab above.

Happy flanneling!

Flannel Friday: Pretty Ladybug

2 Mar

I was looking for something new to add to my bug storytime when I found Mollie Kay’s Pretty Ladybug flannel on Pinterest. Perfect!

Ladybug looks great, but is missing something – spots! We add each one as well as its corresponding number:

After each one, we sing (supposed to be to the tune of “The Muffin Man” but I couldn’t remember that and used “Johnny Works With 1 Hammer”; “London Bridges” would also work):

Ladybug has 1 black spot,

1 black spot, 1 black spot;

Ladybug has 1 black spot,

pretty ladybug!

(From preschooleducation.com)

Eventually pretty ladybug has 6 lovely spots!

The kids I tried it on today really liked it – especially because the song is simple enough for them to learn quickly and join in easily. Thanks, Mollie Kay for this wonderful idea!

The ladybug is all felt and the numbers are painted on felt squares.

The Flannel Friday roundup today will be hosted by Storytime Katie. And check out our Pinterest page for ALL past flannels!  Also, for your convenience, I’ve added a Flannel Friday page (see top menu) where all MY flannels will be archived. Because, you know, it’s all about me.

Happy flanneling!

Flannel Friday: 5 Little Caterpillars/5 Little Butterflies

10 Feb

I must admit, I am VERY proud of how this one turned out. The text is (again) from Storytime Magic but the felt pieces are my patterns (based on clipart pictures I used for the basic shapes; although the tree branch I did freehand).

“Five little caterpillars and not one more…

One spun a cocoon and then there were four.”

The rhymes continue until there are nothing but cocoons hanging from the tree:

“But…

One cocoon opened underneath the sun,

Now there’s a butterfly and that makes one.”

This continues until there are five butterflies!

Here’s a closeup of the butterfly and his corresponding caterpillar. The antennae are made from a pipe cleaner, glued between the body and wings of the butterfly.

I got the idea for the caterpillar paint from a monarch butterfly caterpillar which has similar stripes.  I am working on a template with the basic patterns that I will post here ASAP. But I KNOW all you creative types can just as well make your own beautiful bugs and butterflies!

Happy flanneling!

Library Quine is hosting the roundup today so head on over there to check out ALL the flannel-y goodness! And click the link to the right to see our Pinterest page.

Flannel Friday: 5 Hungry Ants

12 Aug

I’ve posted this one before, as part of my food storytime, but that was long before Flannel Friday started so I thought I would share it again! It’s one of my preschoolers’ favorites, especially since after every sneeze I toss the ant over my shoulder.

Mmmm....cake...

We start by counting the ants, and then, one by one, they march into the food:

5 hungry ants,

marching in a line,

came upon a picnic

where they could dine.

They marched into the salad,

they marched into the cake,

they marched into the pepper….

Uh oh, that was a mistake!

AHHHH-CHOOO!

4 hungry ants….etc….

The ants are ready for their close up.

I like to add words to my flannel pieces where possible, and point out the word as I’m saying it. I have asked the kids what words they think are on the cake, and they can usually guess correctly. Also, this is a vocabulary builder – we talk about what the word “dine” means (not to be mistaken for DIE, which the kids often think I’ve said. It’s good to clarify. Dine is a fancy word for eat! Like “dining room!”)

Check out the full Flannel Friday round up later today; hosted by Cate at Storytiming

Flannel Friday: There’s a Bug on the Teacher

17 Jun

I can’t remember exactly where I found this poem, but I think it’s from The Goof Who Invented Homework: and Other School Poems. At any rate, the poem, and the book, is by Kalli Dakos.

Great for bug or school storytime. Or body parts!  You could also give each child a small plastic bug and have them move it to different parts of their bodies. The bugs could fly in the air during the AHChoo!

Like the bellbottoms?

Here’s the text of the poem. Move the bug around to each body part as it’s mentioned. Mine buzzes as it flies.:

There’s a Bug on the Teacher

by Kalli Dakos

There’s a bug on the teacher,

and it’s crawling on her shoe.

What will she do?

It’s crawling on her shoe!

There’s a bug on the teacher,

And it’s crawling on her pants.

Has us in a trance,

That bug on her pants.

There’s a bug on the teacher,

And it’s crawling on her shirt,

I hope it doesn’t hurt,

That bug on her shirt.

There’s a bug on the teacher,

And it’s crawling on her neck,

Everyone check,

It’s crawling on her neck!

There’s a bug on the teacher,

And it’s crawling on her nose,

Why do you suppose

It’s crawling on her nose?

Oh no! It's on her nose!

AhhhhhCHOOOOOO!!

There’s a bug on the floor,

And it’s crawling out the door!

Check with Melissa later today for the full Flannel Friday Round-Up!

Flannel Friday: The Green Grass Grew All Around

20 May

This is a new one for me; in fact, I’ve not actually used it in storytime yet. I just made it this week! It was suggested by a speech/language pathologist at a conference I attended, and I thought it sounded like a fun one. It’s a cumulative story, and can be sung as an echo song.

What a pretty tree! The prettiest tree you ever did see!

There was a tree…

A pretty little tree…

The prettiest tree…

That you ever did see…

Oh, the tree was in a hole and the hole was in the ground,

And the green grass grew all around, all around, the green grass grew all around.

The verses continue, adding a branch on the tree, a nest in the branch, an egg in the nest, a bird in the egg, a wing on the bird, a feather on the wing, and finally, a bug on the feather.

The final product:

Hole, tree, branch, nest, egg, bird, wing, feather, bug.

And here are the various “extra parts” that go on the tree, shown by themselves:

There are some versions that include the hole, a root, a twig, a leaf, and other various and sundry parts, but I chose to simplify a bit so it wouldn’t be too long and give the kids too much to remember.

You can hear Nancy Stewart sing the full song here – she also has some suggestions for how to use the song with various age groups.

Here’s another version (with video), and here’s the Scout’s version, with 13 verses!

Can’t wait to try this out with my kiddos.

Visit Storytime Katie later today for the full Flannel Friday round-up!

C’mon, Spring, Start Springing! A Bug and Flower Storytime

4 Apr

It’s the time of year in the school schedule when we start celebrating all things spring: flowers, plants, bugs, rain and (oh please) SUNSHINE. Here’s my bug and flower storytime plan, heavy on the bugs.:

I have an awesome watering can puppet (will add a picture later) that I picked up at the Illinois Museum of Natural History several years ago. Your thumb is the spigot, and your fingers are green stems attached to a butterfly, ladybug, bee, and flower, respectively. I start with my fingers scrunched down in the watering can and ask the kids about it. Then I lift my fingers one by one and the kids identify each creature as it comes out.

  • Rosen, Michael. Tiny Little Fly. This is a new title, and the kids have enjoyed it. Tiny little fly flies from elephant to hippo

    Is it a bug? Is it a flower?

    to tiger, and each animal in turn winks his eye and tries to catch the fly. But fly is too tiny, and too fast! There’s a wonderful 4 page spread of all the animals (and fly).

  • Foley, Greg. Don’t Worry, Bear. Bear meets caterpillar as he’s making a cocoon. Once caterpillar is inside, Bear worries about him and so checks on him regularly in the rain, wind, night and snow. Each time caterpillar reassures him, saying “Don’t worry, bear.” This is a sweet story, and although the kids can predict the ending, it’s well-loved. Plus, being able to predict the ending of a story is a good feeling for a kid!
  • Flannelboard: 5 Spring Flowers
  • Carle, Eric. Very Quiet Cricket. This is my favorite of Carle’s bug books (next to the Very Hungry Caterpillar which I use in my Food-themed storytime), but it’s often difficult to find a copy in which the cricket’s noise is still working. Library books wear out. And the kids really love the surprise at the end, so I try to find one that makes the noise. This year I’m using a copy of The Very Clumsy Click Beetle because that’s the one I had that worked. I would also have accepted The Very Lonely Firefly.
  • Song “The Itsy Bitsy Spider”. We end with several rousing choruses of this, with me on ukulele (which means the kids have to promise to help, because I can’t do the hand movements and play at the same time, obviously). First, we sing the “normal” version. Then, a version of the “Great Big Spider” (in very deep voices) and the “Teeny Tiny Spider” (very quietly). We end with a rockin’ version, which is just the regular song but I attempt to play a more energetic and “rock and roll” version. I’ll let you judge for yourself if I succeed:

Other stories I might use:

Buzz Buzz! What are your favorite bug books?

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