Tag Archives: cake

Flannel Friday: 5 Hungry Ants

12 Aug

I’ve posted this one before, as part of my food storytime, but that was long before Flannel Friday started so I thought I would share it again! It’s one of my preschoolers’ favorites, especially since after every sneeze I toss the ant over my shoulder.

Mmmm....cake...

We start by counting the ants, and then, one by one, they march into the food:

5 hungry ants,

marching in a line,

came upon a picnic

where they could dine.

They marched into the salad,

they marched into the cake,

they marched into the pepper….

Uh oh, that was a mistake!

AHHHH-CHOOO!

4 hungry ants….etc….

The ants are ready for their close up.

I like to add words to my flannel pieces where possible, and point out the word as I’m saying it. I have asked the kids what words they think are on the cake, and they can usually guess correctly. Also, this is a vocabulary builder – we talk about what the word “dine” means (not to be mistaken for DIE, which the kids often think I’ve said. It’s good to clarify. Dine is a fancy word for eat! Like “dining room!”)

Check out the full Flannel Friday round up later today; hosted by Cate at Storytiming

Cookies and Cakes and Cows, oh my! Another storytime

2 Dec

‘Tis the season when my thoughts turn to baked goods. So why shouldn’t we have a storytime about cookies and, more deliciously, cake?

My first difficulty was coming up with an appropriate puppet to introduce the theme. It’s not like I have a talking cookie lying

Cake + Cookie = AWESOME.

around. Or even a cookie monster (I used to have a Grover, but he went to live on a farm in the country). I wracked my brain, trying to figure out what animal would be appropriate. Lion who eats cookies instead of small children? No. Coyote? Of course not. Hairy Tarantula? Cool, but what does that have to do with cookies? Finally, it came to me. Cookies (and cake) go with milk. Milk comes from a cow. Cow puppet to the rescue!

So Clara the Cow introduces our theme, by telling the kids that not only does she eat grass, but she also really likes cookies. She sits down to listen, and the stories begin:

  • Emberley, Rebecca and Ed Emberley. The Red Hen. This is the classic story of the Little Red Hen (or la pequeña gallina roja – the first words I ever learned in Spanish, in preschool), told with cake instead of bread. Simple, and with the common “Not I!” refrain so the kids can help with the telling.
  • Carter, David A. Who Took the Cookie From the Cookie Jar? Carter’s is a pop-up version of the classic chant, while Philemon Sturges and Bonnie Lass also have a nice, southwestern-y, non-pop-up version.
  • After reading the book, we continue the chant, but using the children’s names. Each child will have a turn to say “who me?” and “couldn’t be” before pointing or saying the name of the child next to them, and we continue. If you’re not familiar with the words of the chant, here they are. Pat legs and clap along in rhythm.

(All): Who took the cookies from the cookie jar?

(All): [Child’s name] took the cookies from the cookie jar!

(Child): Who me?

(All): Yes, you!

(Child): Couldn’t be.

(All): Then who?

(Child names another child, and we continue…)

  • Beaumont, Karen. Who Ate All the Cookie Dough? Another VERY participatory story, with a rhyming refrain that has a distinct rhythm. A perfect phonological awareness skills-building book.
  • Flannelboard: “Barnaby Bear’s Batter Bowl”. Here’s a version of it, although I made a few changes:
    • In MY version, a mouse is the last animal to arrive, and instead of helping to pull Barnaby out of the bowl, he climbs in and tickles Barnaby’s nose with his whiskers, causing Barnaby to sneeze himself out of the bowl.
    • Also, I changed the animals to ones that were easier for me to make: along with Barnaby Bear and the Mouse, there is an Elephant, a Monkey, and a Rabbit.
    • When Barnaby gets out his biggest bowl, we all use our arms to make giant bowls and pretend to put cake ingredients in. The kids get to practice/expand their food vocabulary.
    • In order to add some print to the flannel, I wrote “BOWL” on the smallest bowl, “BIGGER BOWL” on the next one, and “BIGGEST BOWL” on the largest. I read the words and underline them with my finger.

This is usually enough stuff to get us through a 25 minute storytime. However, I have some additional books stashed away in case I feel like changing things up:

Oh boy. I really want cookies now. Do you think Mrs. Fields delivers?

 

Delicious Cake.

26 Aug

This week I’ve been attending a bunch of preschool open houses, to speak to parents about the library and early literacy and what they can do at home to encourage their child’s pre-reading skills.  Seeing all those new preschoolers check out their classrooms reminded me of a conversation I had with one new student last year.

He was busily trying out the play kitchen, and handed me a plate.

“What’s this?” I asked.

“Chicken,” he responded.

“Mmmm.  I like chicken!”  I noisily pretended to eat, and then handed the plate back.  A few minutes later, he tried to give me another plate.

“What’s this?”

“Chicken.”

“I already had some chicken.  Can I have dessert?”  He put down the plate, picked up another, and handed it to me.

“What’s this?”

“Cake.”

“Oh, I love cake!  What kind of cake is it?”

“Delicious.”

Delicious cake.  My favorite kind.  Much better than inedible, salty, or choke-it-down-if-you-must cake.

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