Tag Archives: Dogs

Ukulele in Storytime: BINGO!

5 Feb

Hi all! Because I love you, I decided to make a fool of myself share what I’ve learned about playing ukulele in storytime in a series of videos. I know lots of folks who are seasoned uke-ists (not a word) and some who are new to the instrument.  I’m somewhere in between, and I hope this will help those newbies gain some confidence in their skills and ROCK OUT in storytime – the kids love it and we all know how important singing is to early literacy skills development!

Here’s the first installment: BINGO! Kids, librarians and teachers alike all know and love this song, and it’s pretty easy to play on the ukulele. In the video I’ll share the chord fingering**, demonstrate playing the song, and show you my fun flannelboard.  I learned which chords to use at this awesome site.

Please excuse the poor lighting and the video quality. I’m no videographer – remember, I did this because I LOVE YOU and want your storytime to be the best it can be!

**What I call an A major chord in the video is actually an A MINOR. Whoops!

 

Bingo was his name-o.

Look for Flip Flap Jack (Aiken Drum) next – the chords I found on the site above were strange, so I figured out my own!

Happy Anniversary Flannel Friday!

20 Jan

I didn’t realize it has been a WHOLE YEAR since Mel started posting flannelboard ideas on her blog every Friday until I saw her post. Holy cow! It’s been a YEAR? And Anne and I, early adopters we, joined in on March 18. We now have a bunch of friends all over the world (yes, WORLD, as Library Quine’s all the way over in Scotland) participating in the fun! And a facebook page! And Pinterest boards! How cool is this? It’s wonderful that librarians are so willing to share their good ideas, all in the name of creating quality storytimes for kids.

So. About this week’s Flannel Friday. There isn’t one. Again. Sorry. Work has been just too busy to work on new ideas, and I’ve run out of already made flannels to use. But I DO have one half done, and REALLY REALLY hope to get it posted next week.

But for those of you who haven’t been on the Flannel Friday bandwagon since the beginning and may not have seen it, here is the FIRST Flannel Friday post I made: Baby Duck, Baby Duck, Are You in the [color] Egg?

And well before that (in 2009, I think, in fact!), I posted THIS about flannelboards in general (which includes my BINGO flannel and monster game flannel)

So hey! I guess I DID post a Flannel Friday today!

Happy Anniversary, y’all!

 

Caldecott Challenge Book Review: Nothing At All by Wanda Gág

3 Jan

“He was not very tall
Nor yet very small;
He looked like nothing,
Like nothing at all.”

Nothing-at-all is perfectly contented to be invisible as long as he can do all of the same things his visible brothers can do. Until, one day, the brothers are adopted by a boy and a girl, who don’t take Nothing-at-all because they cannot see him. Nothing-at-all follows but soon loses them. A friendly Jackdaw, whose task it is to “carry home everything I see,” has helpfully found a Book of Magic which contains a spell to make something that is Nothingy into Somethingy. Needless to say, it works, and Nothing-at-all is able to rejoin his brothers.

Wanda Gag’s illustrations have an undulating quality. The soft pastels (?) seem to move. I loved this book – and if it weren’t so long I would surely share it with the preschoolers! They’d have such fun with the “I’m busy/Getting dizzy” part!

Nothing At All won the Caldecott Honor in 1942.

Flannel Friday: Bark, George

1 Jul

I made this flannel years ago and often forget I have it because I really love reading the book so much. But I got it out this week for a Dog-themed storytime and realized how much I like it!

Bark, George by Jules Feiffer is a simple, but silly, story that’s super easy to memorize.  Here’s George; I made him by photocopying and enlarging an image of George from the book, cutting it out and sticking it on felt, and tracing.

I picked an open-mouthed image of George

I also color photocopied a picture of the doctor; cut him out and covered him with contact paper. A piece of felt is stuck to the back:

Giant George!

Finally, I made tiny felt animals that I pull out of George:

Cat, Duck, Pig and Cow

George is actually 2 layers of felt; the second layer is glued on around the edges but there are openings at his mouth (to pull the animals out) and along his back (to put them in):

The little animals layered inside George in the order in which they will be pulled out.

I adore this story; I have entertained family members by reciting it to them in the car. Who wouldn’t love George?

Visit Katie’s blog later today for the full Flannel Friday roundup!

We’re Reading Dogs and Cats: A Storytime

1 Feb

Woof! Dog stories. Cat stories. Dog AND cat stories. Here are my picks for a Dog-tastic and Cat-tacular storytime!

I have a lovely chocolate lab puppy puppet, named Hershey,Daisy Kitty who introduces our theme. We talk about why he’s named after chocolate (his color) and if he can eat chocolate (NO WAY! POISON!). We’re going to read stories about dogs, but also some cats, too, because I have the lovely creature to the right living in my house and I’m a bit biased.

  • Masurel, Clare. A Cat and A Dog=Un gato y un perro. A very simple story of a cat and a dog that don’t get along, but the preschoolers love it. We try predicting what will happen when the dog’s ball gets stuck in the tree and the cat’s fish goes in the water.
  • Alborough, Jez. Some Dogs Do. Magical realism in a picture book! “Do dogs fly? Is it true? Some dogs don’t, and some dogs do.”
  • Flannelboard: BINGO. My post on this, and pictures of my flannelboard, here.
  • Dodd, Emma. I Don’t Want a Cool Cat. After reading this one, I follow it up with I Don’t Want a Posh Dog. This gives us the opportunity to compare the covers and talk about what’s the same (the girl), what’s different (one has a dog, the other a cat), and the author’s name on both books (building print awareness and learning about authors and illustrators!).

Other books I like and will trade out for some of the above:

  • Beaumont, Karen.Move Over, Rover! A great repeated line, perfect for little kids who want to help.
  • Gravett, Emily. Dogs. The way Gravett depicts the dog that barks is perfect!
  • Henkes, Kevin. Kitten’s First Full Moon=La primera luna llena de gatita. Beautiful, expressive black-and-white illustrations.
  • Himmelman, Jon. Katie Loves the Kittens. The illustrations/book size are a little small for a large group, but if you’ve got a smaller group, or are sharing with just one young person, this one is lovely. It’s so much fun to express Katie’s excitement: “AROOOOOO!!”

And, don’t forget, when you’re doing dog and cat storytime, you can always include Soft Kitty.  Although I’m kinda partial to this version, performed by a colleague of mine in Colorado.

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