Tag Archives: Flannelboard

Flannel Friday! Who Ate All the Cookie Dough?

13 May

Who  Ate All the Cookie Dough, by Karen Beaumont, is a wonderful rhyming story with a great refrain that kids can learn quickly and help out with. I turned her story into a flannelboard, and changed one of the animals (except, obviously, the kangaroo and monkey) to fit the patterns I had.  This would be great for an animals, cookies, kangaroos, or rhyming storytime

First, we start with Kanga, wearing a lovely apron (that hides a secret!):

She loves cookies!

Kanga discovers that someone has eaten all the cookie dough! One by one, she asks the other animals, beginning with Zebra (my kids like to help out with this part):

“Zebra, zebra, do you know,

Who ate all the cookie dough?”

That orange thing is the cookie dough bowl, natch.

Zebra (and each of the animals) answers:

“I don’t know, it wasn’t me, maybe hippo? Let’s go see.”

And they continue asking the other animals, ending with monkey, who says, “Monkey see, monkey do. It wasn’t me, tee hee hee!”

Deny, deny, deny!

Finally, the animals figure out the culprit: under Kanga’s apron, hiding the evidence, is…:

Sneaky little Joey!

He can also come out to face his punishment:

Kangaroo pattern (complete with pouch and removable joey) is here, and lion pattern here. I made up the apron out of my own brain, and the rest of the animals came from a photocopyable pattern book we have here in the library.

Stay tuned to this blog for a Flannel Friday roundup later today!

Flannel Friday! Shapes Rhyme (now with homemade finger puppets!)

29 Apr

Today’s Flannel Friday post is about shapes! Technically, this isn’t a flannel BOARD story (although it can be used as such) but a rhyme told with puppets.  When I first read this rhyme, I decided, since the shapes are “talking”, they should be puppets. So I cut the shapes out of two pieces of felt, glued them together on all but one side (leaving a space for fingers), and added faces, googly eyes, hands, and feet. The finished product looks like this:

Meet Ricky Rectangle

Here’s the rhyme:

Ricky Rectangle is my name,

My four sides are not the same.

Two are short and two are long.

Count my sides, come right along!

I’m Sammy Square, that’s my name

My four sides are just the same.

Sammy and Ricky strut their stuff!

I’m Timmy Triangle, that’s my name!

My three sides are short, or long, or just the same!

I’m Suzie Circle.

Watch me bend!

Round and round from end to end.

Timmy and Suzie. Suzie looks rather surprised! (her mouth is also a circle)

 Ollie Oval, that is me.

I’m not round, as you can see!

Like an egg that is laid,

That’s the way I am made!

Ollie's one happy shape.

While hunting for the original source of this rhyme, I found similar versions online that include stars, diamonds, octagons, and even hearts.  Maybe I’ll add to my shape puppet collection!

Please also visit So Tomorrow, Rain Makes Applesauce, Miss Mollie, Mel’s Desk, Nikarella and Storytime Katie (links to the right) for more Flannel Friday Fun! And if you’re on twitter, search for #flannelfriday.

Flannel Friday! Who Uses This?

22 Apr

In today’s edition of Flannel Friday – no rhyme, no song. Just pictures, and words.

I try to include words on as many of my flannels as possible. While preschoolers generally can’t/aren’t reading them yet, I point out the words and hope they’re making the connection between what I’m saying and what is written. It’s kind of my little way of continuing what the preschool teachers do; labeling many things in their classrooms.

One of the themes that preschools often take up is “community helpers.” You know – people who make a difference in their communities, like firefighters, police officers, teachers, garbage collectors (absolutely!), LIBRARIANS, etc.   This flannel is a take-off on that theme.

I made a bunch of objects that various “community helpers” (or people doing specific jobs) might use. I picked occupations that had a specific “item” associated with them that the kids might recognize.  I freehanded them all (althought I do look at pictures online so I can get an idea of what something looks like).  I labeled them all; the kids also might learn a bit of new vocabulary:

The kids tell me what the object is, and I show them the word. I then ask, “who uses this?” When they tell me, I add the word for that occupation. These are paper, covered in contact paper, with velcro tabs on the back:

Firefighter’s hydrant; Librarian’s book (yes, that’s a picture of me on the word strip):

Hairstylist/Barber’s scissors; Doctor’s stethoscope.

Mail carrier’s letter (on the back it looks like an envelope and says “letter”; teacher’s pencil.

Can you think of any objects I should add?

Flannel Friday! 5 Spring Flowers

25 Mar

I am ready for spring.  It’s happening here in fits and starts; I would appreciate a solid week of 60 or 70 degree weather SO MUCH.

To encourage spring to stay a while, I’ve started performing my bug/flower storytime. I will post that storytime in its entirety next week, but in the meantime, here’s the flannel. I can’t remember where I found the rhyme, but if I discover it again, I will post the source!:

Look what’s growing on my flannelboard!

We start by counting the flowers as I put them on the board, and then I ask about the colors. For the two-colored flowers, I ask about the color on the outside, and the color on the inside (yay for vocabulary building!). I ask the kids to show me 5 fingers, and we begin.

5 spring flowers, all in a row. [hold up 5 fingers]

The first one says [hold up 1 finger] “we need rain to grow” [use fingers to show rain]

The second one says [hold up 2 fingers] “oh yes, we need water” [nod head yes]

The third one says [hold up 3 fingers] “it’s getting hotter!” [fan face with hand]

The fourth one says [hold up 4 fingers] “I see clouds in the sky!” [point up]

The fifth one says [hold up 5 fingers] “I wonder why!” [shrug shoulders and hold up hands questioningly]

Boom! Crash!

Then…BOOM! went the thunder [add cloud to board] and CRASH! went the lightning [add lightning bolt]

That springtime storm was very frightening [hug self as if scared]

But the flowers weren’t worried, oh no, no, no! [shake head]

Because the rain helped them to grow, grow, grow! [raise arms as if growing]

The preschoolers always figure out the “grow” part without me having to tell them. We do the whole thing twice, and they help even more the second time.

Enjoy!

%d bloggers like this: