Tag Archives: reading

Fill ‘er Up!

1 Aug

Here’s another blast from the Revolution Read Aloud past…:

Over the past couple of weekends I’ve been training, with a colleague, future library volunteers on how to perform a successful storytime. Included in that training is some basic early literacy information, so that volunteers will understand the importance of what they’re doing and what children are getting out of it (and why we do the things we do – fingerplays, flannelboards, age-appropriate stories, etc.).

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My colleague used an analogy that I really like, and I thought I’d share it with you.  She said that children hearing stories are filling up their “word reservoirs” – so that they’ll have all those words to use in the future. We often talk about the idea of young children as sponges, soaking up experiences to learn about the world around them. Well, to continue her analogy, some of what they’re soaking up is getting wrung out into their word reservoir.

Let’s help our kids fill their reservoirs to the brim by reading lots of stories and talking to them all the time!

The Caldecott Challenge 2012: Nerdcott!

2 Jan

The end of last week I saw some kids’ librarian folks on twitter talking about “#nerdcott” and decided to check it out. I followed the twitter trail to this post by LibLaura5, describing a challenge she was setting to read ALL of the Caldecott winners (not just the medalists, but honors too!). Well, I love a good (do-able) challenge, so I decided that I’m in! I’m pretty knowledgeable about winners and honors from the last 15-or-so years (or at least the last 12 years that I’ve been working as a librarian), but the early years? Not so much. Did you know that the Caldecott Medal was first awarded in 1938? And that there are over 300 Caldecott medalists and honor books?

I’d better get crackin’. The best thing about Laura’s challenge is that THERE ARE NO RULES. You don’t have to read the books in any particular order (which is good because some of them we have in the library, and some I will have to request from other libraries or ILL). You don’t have to set a time limit, if you don’t want to. So, my personal goal is to simply READ THEM ALL. Preferrably this year.

I’ve already started from the bottom up; again, not in order, but that’s how I’m keeping track: I’m ordering the books from the earlier years first and reading them as they come in. I read Andy and the Lion and Barkis this morning, and have Wee Gillis, Abraham Lincoln, and Snow White and the Seven Dwarves on my desk. I probably won’t review all of them here as I really only like to write reviews of books that a) I love and b) feel inspired to write about.

Wanna challenge yourself? Get the full list of Caldecott Medal and Honor books. If you have a blog and want to indicate your participation, Laura has made an icon available.  And remember, if you tweet, don’t forget to add the hashtag #nerdcott so we can all enjoy each other’s company!

 

 

Do I HAVE to do voices?

10 Oct

I was asked this once, by a Head Start father, via the site’s Family Support Worker.

My response: No. You don’t HAVE to do voices.

But when sharing books with young children, here’s what you HAVE to do: HAVE FUN. Personally, I don’t think I really do “voices”. I think I have one voice, and all the characters are a variation on that one voice.  It gets higher, lower, louder, softer, or more child-like or adult. But to me, it sounds very much like the same voice. Others have told me differently. But what I KNOW I do is have fun, and so the kids have fun too.  Having fun with books is so important. When kids think books are fun, they are motivated to learn to read on their own. If books are boring, uninteresting, or a chore, well, who in their right mind would want to pick one up and read it?

I tell people that no, you don’t have to worry about creating different character voices and keep track of them all. But if a character says he’s sad, make him sound sad. If he’s excited, he should sound that way! The book’s text and illustrations give lots of clues how to read a story: print size, the character’s face, if something was shouted, or whispered, etc. Make animal sounds or truck sounds. Be silly.  Make the story go beyond words on a page and come to life.

 

Pages from Maybe a Bear Ate It by Robie H. Harris

 

Take a look at this page, from Maybe a Bear Ate It by Robie H. Harris, illustrated by Michael Emberley. It gives pretty clear clues about how to read the story: in the first illustration, the little bear/cat/creature is obviously sad. In the second, he’s gone from sad to out-and-out crying. Also, the text gives clues: the hyphens on the first page make us pause between words, and the text in the second is larger, making the words more insistent and louder.  While you don’t need to go full-on shakespearean for this passage, you can easily make the creature sound sad, and more distressed at the loss of his book.

Beyond your storytime performance, though, what’s most fun for a young child, though, is the chance to snuggle up in a parent or caregiver’s lap, and hear a story, look at pictures, and talk about the book. It’s that one-on-one sharing time with a loved one that really helps the learning take place, and the child will forever equate books with that warm feeling. And when they’re ready to learn to read, they will, if they’ve had enough of that quality time with books.

Why I do what I do…(ie. act like a total goofball)

6 Jun

This quotation* was the tagline to a recent e-mail I received.  I thought it was a perfect summation of why I really “perform” when I’m reading a book aloud to children:

“They may forget what you said, but they will never  forget how you made them feel.” Carl W. Buechner

I have no idea who this Carl Buechner guy is, but what he said makes sense.   The kids may not remember exactly what book I read, but if it made them laugh, feel good, or otherwise have a positive experience, then they will remember that books are fun.  And that’s the goal.  If books are fun, we want to learn to read them.  And the more we read, the better we get.  Young children are very non-judgemental.  So be silly, do the voices (if you can), make the character sound sad if the text says he is.  The kids will love you for it.

*Look, Mr. Moore, (my college Shakespeare professor) I used it correctly!  It’s quotation, not quote, that’s the noun, he said.

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