Tag Archives: Spanish

“We Wave Our Scarves Together” versión en español

11 Jan

My preschoolers and I, we LOVE scarf songs. Waving our scarves in the air is so much fun (gross motor skills!), along with trying to squish them up as small as possible and hide them in our hands (fine motor skills!). Scarf songs are a great way to get the wiggles out, build vocabulary and rhyming skills, and also develop those all-important fine and gross motor skills. Scarf songs FTW!

For my Spanish-speaking kids, I had been using the English version of “We Wave Our Scarves Together” (great jbrary video here to learn the tune) and just explaining the movement in Spanish before we sang. Today, though, I decided it wouldn’t be that hard to come up with a translation. So here it is: my quick-and-dirty translation that almost fits, syllabically (is that a word?).

“We Wave Our Scarves Together” versión en español

Agitamos los pañuelos, [we wave our scarves]

Agitamos los pañuelos.

Agitamos los pañuelos,

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

Agitámoslos arriba, [we wave them above]

Agitámoslos abajo. [we wave them below]

Agitámoslos en medio, [we wave them in the middle]

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

Tiramos los pañuelos, [we throw our scarves]

Tiramos los pañuelos.

Tiramos los pañuelos,

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

 

Hope this is helpful to some of you!

 

Flannel Friday! Conejito by Margaret Read MacDonald

8 Jun

Conejito, retold by Margaret Read MacDonald, is based on a folktale from Panama. It’s a fun story with lots of repetition and, of course, a happy ending. I have been sharing this story with the preschoolers as part of my Bunnies storytime, and they’ve been enjoying it – even those who don’t speak any Spanish (there are Spanish words throughout, but they’re all explained and easily understood in context).

We start with conejito (little bunny) talking to his mother, and preparing to go up the hill to visit his Tia Mónica (Aunt Monica). When he gets there, she is going to feed him “cakes, cookies and every good thing” until he is gordito, gordito, gordito (fat, fat, fat!).

I gave mom some rockin’ glasses.

Conejito heads up the mountain, singing…

I have a sweet old Auntie,

My tía Mónica,

And when she goes out dancing,

They all say “Ooh la la!”

…until he runs THUNK into a Tiger. Señor Tigre.

Señor Tigre wants to eat conejito for lunch, but conejito convinces him to wait until he returns from Tía Mónica’s house because he will be gordito gordito gordito. Right now he is too skinny – flaquito flaquito flaquito!

Tigre agrees and conejito continues on his way singing and dancing until he runs smack into Mr. Lion – Señor León.

Conejito also convinces Señor Leon to wait to eat conejito, and he continues up the hill until he runs THUNK into Tía Mónica.

She’s fancy. She has a flower tucked behind her ear.

Conejito spends the summer with her, dancing, playing, and eating cakes, cookies and every good thing (but also fruits, vegetables, and fresh mountain water so he will be strong, strong, strong!). But when it’s time to head back to his Mamá, he tells Tía Mónica his problem.

Her solution is this: He will roll down the hill in a barrilito (little barrel). If Lion or Tiger stop him, he will tell them the mountain is on fire (Tía’s made a fire to make smoke) and they’d better run for it.

Conejito fits under the barrel.

Conejito DOES meet Lion and Tiger, but tells them:

The mountain’s on fire,

conejito is too,

you’d better run Señor León

or you’ll be barbecue!

They, of course, run away so conejito is able to continue rolling down the hill until he reaches his mamá. All’s well that ends well!

I’m going to learn this story so I’ll be able to tell it without the book. It shouldn’t be too hard to learn. I won’t know it perfectly, but well enough! I think this would make a fun readers’ theater too! The book contains the notes for singing the song about Auntie Monica, but I ended up making up my own tune. The kids liked chiming in on the “ooh la la!” The book also has a fox in addition to tiger and lion, but I decided to shorten the flannel version a little.

I got all the animal templates from Clker.com: rabbit, lion and tiger. You can also get the lion and tiger in two parts – head and body separated – from the same site.

Today’s roundup will be hosted by Katie at Recipe for Reading. To see all past flannels, click the icon to the right.

Happy flanneling!

What time is it? It’s STORYTIME! Plus, the Littlest Translator

13 Dec

Two “amusing anecdotes” (as my father would say) today:

A little girl was looking at her new pink watch and whispering to a friend. The teacher tapped her on the shoulder to get her attention and quiet her down. The girl looked at me, and I asked her what time it was. “It’s storytime!” she chirped.

Don’t we all need a watch like that?

A little boy was jabbering in Spanish, telling me something about the “noche” (I’m fluent, but he was talking so fast I didn’t get it all). Another little boy looked at me and said: “Asi se dice night.” [that’s how you say night]. Thanks, buddy, for the translation! And good on you for being bilingual!

I got the best card from one of my classes today, with a picture of all the kids and their signatures. Things like that I always treasure. I work with some fabulous teachers, and the students they teach are a delight.

 

Flannel Friday! The Bossy Gallito/El Gallo de Bodas

30 Sep

You DO know Lucía M. González’s great retelling of the Cuban folktale The Bossy Gallito, no? You DON’T? Well then, go get it, now! I had the great fortune of hearing Ms. González herself tell the story at the recent REFORMA National Conference, and it reminded me how much I love the story and inspired me to create this flannelboard.

The Bossy Gallito is a classic cumulative tale involving a Gallo (Rooster) who’s going to the wedding of his Tío Perico, and so is all dressed up in his finest. When he sees some yummy corn, sitting in the dirt, on his path, he eats it, and dirties his beak. Well, he CAN’T go to the wedding looking like this! So he asks the grass (not very nicely) to clean his beak. Grass refuses, so the Gallo asks Goat to eat the grass since it won’t help him. This continues (Gallo asks stick to hit goat, fire to burn stick, and water to douse fire), until he FINALLY  politely asks Sun to dry up the water. Sun agrees, and so water, not wanting to be dried up, agrees to douse fire. Fire, not wanting to be doused, agrees to burn stick…and so on, until grass cleans Gallo’s beak and he is able to go to the wedding of his Tío Perico.

Here’s the Bossy Gallito in all his glory (sans paint accents, which I haven’t yet had time to add). I used this clipart pattern.

Note spiffy bow tie.

And in order of appearance. here’s the grass and the goat (from this clipart pattern):

The stick and the fire (both freehanded, obviously):

And, finally, the water and the sun (also freehanded):

Everybody’s got eyes and smiles as they’re all kind of anthropomorphized in the story. I also got ideas from Katie Cunningham’s Bilingual Children’s Programming blog – scroll down for pictures of her flannel pieces; they’re really cute!

Visit Rain Makes Applesauce later today for the full Flannel Friday roundup! ¡Diviértense!

Flannel Friday: Mouse Count/Cuenta de Ratón

15 Jul

Today’s Flannel Friday idea comes from Making Learning Fun.

I made a jar and 10 mice of various colors. After reading Ellen Stoll Walsh’s Mouse Count, we sing this rhyme, to the tune of “Frere Jacques”:

Mouse count, mouse count

Mouse count, mouse count

Count with me, count with me

How many mice, how many mice

Do you see? Do you see?*

I DID have 10 mice. Where did #10 go?

We count the mice. I take one or more away and then we recite the rhyme and count again. This can be done an endless number of times!

To change things up, and to promote vocabulary, we also count how many mice are INSIDE (adentro) the jar, and how many mice are OUTSIDE (afuera). I may also ask the kids to name the specific colors inside or outside.

Inside mouse, outside mouse

We also do the same with UPSIDE DOWN (cabeza abajo) and RIGHT SIDE UP:

Upside down mouse, right side up mouse

This would work well for a Mice, Colors, or Counting-themed storytime.

For the full Flannel Friday roundup, visit Andrea later today!

*P.S.: I just made up this Spanish rhyme: doesn’t rhyme perfectly, but works with the tune:

Ratoncitos, ratoncitos,

Cuéntalos, cuéntalos

Cuántos ratoncitos

Cuántos ratoncitos

Puedes ver? Puedes ver?

Flannel Friday! 1 Elephant Went Out To Play/Un elefante se balanceaba…

3 Jun

This week I’m doing a “Big, Grey Animals” Storytime: Elephants, Rhinos, and Hippos. So many great books to choose from! I will post all of my choices later on, but for now, here’s my flannelboard for this traditional rhyme:

Hard to tell, but Elephant #1 is grey. Really.

1 Elephant went out to play

Upon a spider’s web one day

He had such enormous fun

He called another elephant to come.

(HEY, ELEPHANT!)

2 Elephants went out to play

Upon a spider’s web one day

They had such enormous fun,

They called another elephant to come…

etc.

I used a pipe cleaner for the web – it sticks really well. I’ve also used a piece of yarn, tied around the flannelboard. I decided to number my elephants to reinforce numeracy, and I did them in a variety of colors so we could, at the end, talk about them. “What color is number 3?”

Will the spider web hold them all?

Aren’t the elephants cute? I used this clipart elephant as my pattern.

When we get all 8 elephants on the spider web, I give the whole thing a shake and they fall off. Yes, I said 8: I only made 8 because why do we always have to count to 5 or 10? You can make as many as you like.

That's a lot of elephants!

This is also a traditional rhyme in Spanish; here’s the text:

Un elefante se balanceaba

Sobre la tela de una araña

Como veía que resistía,

Fue a llamar a otro elefante!

¡ELEFANTE!

Dos elefantes se balanceaban

Sobre la tela de una araña

Como veían que resistía,

Fueron a llamar otro elefante…

etc.

Here’s a video of me singing the song version, in Spanish, on the StoryBlocks website.

Check in with Miss Mollie’s Storytime Fun later today for the full Flannel Friday roundup!

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