Tag Archives: Spring

Trailer Tuesday: And Then It’s Spring by Julie Fogliano

6 Dec

It’s 11 degrees today here in Colorado. So I’m kinda dreaming of Spring.  And I’m definitely looking forward to this book about Spring, illustrated by Caldecott meadalist Erin Stead! I love the splashes of color, and the story looks like it will be just right for young ones learning about seeds, plants, and weather.

Flannel Friday! If You Should Meet an Elephant

28 Oct

It all started when I found this song while hunting for flannelboard resources. I knew RIGHT AWAY I wanted to make it into a flannelboard!:

If you should meet an elephant on a summer’s day

What would you do? What would you say?

I’d say “Good Morning Elephant, how do you do?”

I’m glad to meet you elephant, I’d like to dance with you.”

The song continues with different animals for each of the 4 seasons. So I created this (not the same animals as on the original song, but I don’t think the kind of animal is that important):

The patterns of the animals came from OpenClipArt.  I then created these backgrounds for the seasons (which I freehanded and am EXTREMELY proud of) with some iconic images to help the kids figure out which season it is if they can’t yet read the words:

Put them together, and you have this!:

DTLK has also included SHEET MUSIC, which means I can probably learn this for the ukulele. Also there are activities and craft suggestions! This flannel would be great for an animals or seasons storytime, obviously. Or a music storytime?

Visit Tracey’s blog later today for the full Flannel Friday compilation, and click on the FF icon to the right to go to our Pinterest page, where you can see a visual organization of all the flannels from this week and past weeks! Follow the hashtag #flannelfriday on twitter so catch all the flannelly goodness (although twitter can be occasionally wonky, so be sure to check the compilation to make sure you’ve seen them all).

Flannel Friday: The Green Grass Grew All Around

20 May

This is a new one for me; in fact, I’ve not actually used it in storytime yet. I just made it this week! It was suggested by a speech/language pathologist at a conference I attended, and I thought it sounded like a fun one. It’s a cumulative story, and can be sung as an echo song.

What a pretty tree! The prettiest tree you ever did see!

There was a tree…

A pretty little tree…

The prettiest tree…

That you ever did see…

Oh, the tree was in a hole and the hole was in the ground,

And the green grass grew all around, all around, the green grass grew all around.

The verses continue, adding a branch on the tree, a nest in the branch, an egg in the nest, a bird in the egg, a wing on the bird, a feather on the wing, and finally, a bug on the feather.

The final product:

Hole, tree, branch, nest, egg, bird, wing, feather, bug.

And here are the various “extra parts” that go on the tree, shown by themselves:

There are some versions that include the hole, a root, a twig, a leaf, and other various and sundry parts, but I chose to simplify a bit so it wouldn’t be too long and give the kids too much to remember.

You can hear Nancy Stewart sing the full song here – she also has some suggestions for how to use the song with various age groups.

Here’s another version (with video), and here’s the Scout’s version, with 13 verses!

Can’t wait to try this out with my kiddos.

Visit Storytime Katie later today for the full Flannel Friday round-up!

Spring smells like…

18 May

Yesterday we read Will Hillenbrand’s Spring Is Here.  It was a nice day, and the kids were playing outside when I arrived, so we had storytime on the lawn.

On one page Mole sticks his nose out the window and sniffs to check if Spring has arrived. I asked the kids what they thought spring smelled like.

“To me, it smells like grass,” I said, as the distinct smell of fresh mown grass was in the air.

One young man contributed this: “It smells like a good day.”

I think he’s right. Spring smells like a good day.

C’mon, Spring, Start Springing! A Bug and Flower Storytime

4 Apr

It’s the time of year in the school schedule when we start celebrating all things spring: flowers, plants, bugs, rain and (oh please) SUNSHINE. Here’s my bug and flower storytime plan, heavy on the bugs.:

I have an awesome watering can puppet (will add a picture later) that I picked up at the Illinois Museum of Natural History several years ago. Your thumb is the spigot, and your fingers are green stems attached to a butterfly, ladybug, bee, and flower, respectively. I start with my fingers scrunched down in the watering can and ask the kids about it. Then I lift my fingers one by one and the kids identify each creature as it comes out.

  • Rosen, Michael. Tiny Little Fly. This is a new title, and the kids have enjoyed it. Tiny little fly flies from elephant to hippo

    Is it a bug? Is it a flower?

    to tiger, and each animal in turn winks his eye and tries to catch the fly. But fly is too tiny, and too fast! There’s a wonderful 4 page spread of all the animals (and fly).

  • Foley, Greg. Don’t Worry, Bear. Bear meets caterpillar as he’s making a cocoon. Once caterpillar is inside, Bear worries about him and so checks on him regularly in the rain, wind, night and snow. Each time caterpillar reassures him, saying “Don’t worry, bear.” This is a sweet story, and although the kids can predict the ending, it’s well-loved. Plus, being able to predict the ending of a story is a good feeling for a kid!
  • Flannelboard: 5 Spring Flowers
  • Carle, Eric. Very Quiet Cricket. This is my favorite of Carle’s bug books (next to the Very Hungry Caterpillar which I use in my Food-themed storytime), but it’s often difficult to find a copy in which the cricket’s noise is still working. Library books wear out. And the kids really love the surprise at the end, so I try to find one that makes the noise. This year I’m using a copy of The Very Clumsy Click Beetle because that’s the one I had that worked. I would also have accepted The Very Lonely Firefly.
  • Song “The Itsy Bitsy Spider”. We end with several rousing choruses of this, with me on ukulele (which means the kids have to promise to help, because I can’t do the hand movements and play at the same time, obviously). First, we sing the “normal” version. Then, a version of the “Great Big Spider” (in very deep voices) and the “Teeny Tiny Spider” (very quietly). We end with a rockin’ version, which is just the regular song but I attempt to play a more energetic and “rock and roll” version. I’ll let you judge for yourself if I succeed:

Other stories I might use:

Buzz Buzz! What are your favorite bug books?

Flannel Friday! 5 Spring Flowers

25 Mar

I am ready for spring.  It’s happening here in fits and starts; I would appreciate a solid week of 60 or 70 degree weather SO MUCH.

To encourage spring to stay a while, I’ve started performing my bug/flower storytime. I will post that storytime in its entirety next week, but in the meantime, here’s the flannel. I can’t remember where I found the rhyme, but if I discover it again, I will post the source!:

Look what’s growing on my flannelboard!

We start by counting the flowers as I put them on the board, and then I ask about the colors. For the two-colored flowers, I ask about the color on the outside, and the color on the inside (yay for vocabulary building!). I ask the kids to show me 5 fingers, and we begin.

5 spring flowers, all in a row. [hold up 5 fingers]

The first one says [hold up 1 finger] “we need rain to grow” [use fingers to show rain]

The second one says [hold up 2 fingers] “oh yes, we need water” [nod head yes]

The third one says [hold up 3 fingers] “it’s getting hotter!” [fan face with hand]

The fourth one says [hold up 4 fingers] “I see clouds in the sky!” [point up]

The fifth one says [hold up 5 fingers] “I wonder why!” [shrug shoulders and hold up hands questioningly]

Boom! Crash!

Then…BOOM! went the thunder [add cloud to board] and CRASH! went the lightning [add lightning bolt]

That springtime storm was very frightening [hug self as if scared]

But the flowers weren’t worried, oh no, no, no! [shake head]

Because the rain helped them to grow, grow, grow! [raise arms as if growing]

The preschoolers always figure out the “grow” part without me having to tell them. We do the whole thing twice, and they help even more the second time.

Enjoy!

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