Tag Archives: storytelling

(Not) Flannel Friday: “Mrs. Mark’s Favorite Color” File Folder Story

6 Jan

The lovely Anne over at So Tomorrow has many times mentioned the book Storytime Magic by Kathy MacMillan and Christine Kirker as a source for many of her great flannelboards.  And when I finally got my grubby little paws on it, I found myself marking practically every other page as something I wanted to do for my storytimes.  This book is a gold mine!

SO. MANY. IDEAS!

Today’s (not flannel) story is on page 54. Mrs. Mark has a living room painted white, because that’s her favorite color. But when she sees the trunks of the trees outside, she decides that brown is her favorite color and so she paints her living room that color. This continues for a while – Mrs. Mark seeing something and deciding to paint her room that color.

We use a file folder, taped shut on all but one side, with a paint can image glued on front and the “paint” cut out to reveal the color. The color sheets are in order in the file folder, and every time she changes her mind, you pull the top sheet out to reveal the new color. I, of course, put labels on the colors.

Finally, Mrs. Mark decides she loves all the colors equally and can’t choose just one, so she decides to paint the room…

…like a rainbow!

I laminated the file folder so that it would be sturdier. Patterns for all the stories in Storytime Magic are provided online (at the link above), so I didn’t have to draw this great paint can myself. What a great resource this book is! Thanks, Anne, for the recommendation!

The full Flannel Friday roundup today will be hosted by Mollie, and you can click the link to the right to see all past flannels organized in a visual fashion. Enjoy!

Flannel Friday: Mortimer by Robert Munsch

23 Sep

As I promised Tuesday, here’s a flannelboard version of Robert Munsch’s story Mortimer. All of the images are from microsoft clipart, and the stairs are felt.

Here’s Mortimer, ready for bed:

After Mortimer “makes his noise” (CLANG! CLANG! RATTLE-BING-BANG!), his mom, and then his dad, come up the stairs (STOMP STOMP STOMP) and tell him to GO TO SLEEP!* (I added the word bubble for extra print awareness and to cue the kids to say it with me):

After promising to quiet down, Mortimer continues to make noise, even after his sisters, and then the neighbors, come up and tell him to GO TO SLEEP!:

Finally, the police show up and also try to get Mortimer to GO TO SLEEP!:

But of course, Mortimer finally has to tell THEM to be quiet so he can GO TO SLEEP!

*When I made the flannelboard I remembered the story saying “GO TO SLEEP!”; it actually says “BE QUIET!”. I didn’t have time to make that piece. I’ll probably change it, but I think “go to sleep” works fine too. Also, Munsch’s story ends with Mortimer falling asleep, but a former colleague of mine ended it with Mortimer telling everyone to BE QUIET which I think is funnier.

Here’s the video of Robert Munsch reading the book so that you can learn the REAL story:

 

Check back HERE later today for the full Flannel Friday roundup!

Flannel Friday: Dear Zoo

9 Sep

Most of us are familiar with Rod Campbell’s book Dear Zoo. It’s a storytime classic! Kizclub has great printable storytime pages that can be easily turned into a flannelboard story. I printed, cut out, and mounted each piece on construction paper. I covered each with contact paper, and then attached the animal to it’s box with book tape so it could be opened. A velcro button on the back of each attaches it to the flannelboard.

I especially like that Kizclub includes the key words of the story. I put these below each of the boxes, after opening, and after reading the word and running my finger under it from left to right. Helps the kids make print connections!

Story Stretcher: In Front of My House by Marianne Dubuc

21 Aug

Some books really lend themselves to discussion. They make storytimes REALLY conversational and fun. Marianne Dubuc’s In Front of My House might not make the best storytime story (the book is kinda small so wouldn’t work for big crowds) but reading it one-on-one could prompt some fun storytelling, or, if you’ve got a class of kindergarteners or 1st graders, lead to a great writing exercise.

The story begins with: “On a little hill, behind a brown fence, under a big oak tree, [and on the opposite page] is…” The next page follows with a noun: “my house.” Opposite that is another prepositional phrase: “In front of my house….” and we have to turn the page to see what’s in front. The book continues in this way, with noun on the left and prepositional phrase on the right, as the story gets more and more outrageous, and princesses, vampires, an orangutan, and outer space come in to play (not at all in a scary way).*

Can you see the possibilities? It would be great fun to create your own story using In Front of My House as a model. Kids could write and illustrate their own stories, or you could take turns creating the story out loud.  Mine would go something like this:

On a mountain, by a lake, there is….a cabin

In front of the cabin…a garden

In the garden….some flowers.

On the flowers….a bee.

Near the bee…a window.

In the window…a face.

On the face…a smile.

Hmmm…I’ll have to think about the rest of it.

 

*One picture is of a hunter with a gun. He’s not doing anything with it, or aiming it, just holding it. It’s not mentioned in the story. But some schools have rules about guns, so I thought I would give a heads’ up.

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