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Books I Can’t Wait to Get My Hands On: 2019 Picture Books Edition (H – M)

17 Mar

Pt. 2 – MOAR BOOKS! I am so late in getting this post done that some of these books have already been released and I have already gotten my lucky hands on them. But maybe you haven’t?

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison

Because… dads, loving your hair and illustrations by Vashti Harrison? YES PLEASE.

The Happy Book (and other feelings) by Andy Rash

Because… Andy Rash’s Are You a Horse? is hilarious and a great storytime read. And we can always use more books about feelings!

High Five by Adam Rubin, illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

Because… interactive books are an easy sell. And from the team that brought us Dragons Love Tacos? Yes, please! 

Hey, Water by Antoinette Portis

Because… I will always read an Antoinette Portis book. This one is non-fiction!

Hush Little Bunny by David Ezra Stein

Because… the traditional lullaby is reimagined with a dad as the singer! It’s already been released so check it out now! 

I’m Worried by Michael Ian Black, illustrated by Debbie Ridpath Ohi

Because… the first two books in this series, I’m Bored and I’m Sad, were excellent. And we need more books to help children deal with worries and anxiety. Plus, potato.

Like a Lizard by April Pulley Sayre, illustrated by Stephanie Laberis

Because… April Pulley Sayre produces some of the best storytime-appropriate non-fiction books out there. 

A Little Chicken by Tammi Sauer, illustrated by Dan Taylor

Because… Tammi Sauer. ‘Nuff said. Also – check out the cool glasses on that chicken.

The Little Guys by Vera Brosgol

Because… I don’t know what’s going on here, but I think I like it!

A Little Book about Spring by Leo Lionni, illustrated by Julie Hamilton

Because… Leo Lionni!

Little Taco Truck by Tanya Valentine, illustrated by Jorge Marti

Because… A book about a taco truck? Why did no one think of this earlier? And doesn’t that little truck look cute as a button?

Lola Goes to School by Anna McQuinn, illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw

Because… I had my first meaningful experience witnessing the power of representation in picture books when a little girl who looked just like Lola chose one of her early stories. The Lola books have been special to me ever since. 

Lubna and Pebble by Wendy Meddour, illustrated by Daniel Egneus

Because… we absolutely need more stories about the refugee child’s experience.

Magic Ramen: The Story of Momofuku Ando by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Kana Urbanowicz

Because… I love ramen. And haven’t you ever wondered how those delicious bricks of instant ramen magic came about?

Mary Wears What She Wants by Keith Negley

Because… the title could have been written about me? Also, I’ve seen this one and it is excellent. Would work well in a storytime about individuality and even gender nonconformity – Mary in this book was one of the first to buck gender norms and wear pants. 

Mighty Reader and the Big Freeze by Will Hillenbrand

Because… doesn’t that dog look a little bit like Underdog? Also, I love a reading superhero!

Monkey Time by Michael Hall

Because… I enjoy Michael Hall’s illustrations. And a story helping children understand the passage of time seems useful! 

Music for Mr. Moon by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead

Because… the Steads’ books are always poignant and beautiful.

My Footprints by Bao Phi, illustrated by Basia Tran

Because… the premise, about a Vietnamese-American girl with two moms who feels “double different” and is bullied, sounds like a story much needed. 

My Heart by Corinna Luyken

Because… I have seen this one and it is, indeed, heartfelt.

My Mama is a Mechanic By Doug Cenko

Because… his companion story, My Daddy is a Princess, was great.

My Papi Has a Motorcycle

Because… more dad love! And SHE HAS A UNICORN HELMET.

Next post, with the last of the books, coming soon(er than the time it took me to get this one done after the first!).

 

 

Ukulele in Storytime: “You’ll Sing a Song”

27 Jan

It’s time for another edition of Ukulele in Storytime! This Ella Jenkins’ classic has become my new closing song and I’m loving it. It contains the G, Am, F and G7 chords. It’s pretty simple, though – you can learn it! I think it’s a nice quiet song to share with families and you can do any kind of action you want. In Ella’s version she has the kids pick the actions, which would be a nice option!

Shoutout to Storytime Ukulele for including the chords (two options!) so I could learn to play this!

Flannel Friday Roundup for 6/2/17

2 Jun

Whoo hoo! Lucky me! I’m hosting the roundup for this week!

Two most excellent flannels to share:

Kate at Felt Board Magic brings us 5 Candles on a Birthday Cake which looks good enough to eat!

Wendy at Flannel Board Fun has some absolutely adorable characters in her Old MacDonald set.

Check out the pinterest page to see all past flannels (and hoo boy are there a LOT of them).

Happy flanneling!

The Alphabet For Us: New Alphabet Song for Storytime!

23 Apr

Hey guys, I wrote a thing! This melody magically formed itself in my head one morning, and soon alphabet lyrics started joining it. I had the good sense to record it on a voice recorder, and later I fleshed out the lyrics. I tried to use words that don’t appear in lots of alphabet songs but might be somewhat familiar (except for the Xantus, of course. I had to google that one).

Here’s the tune and ukulele chords! The lyrics are written below. As I say in the video, the fun part is that you can substitute any words you want for each of the letters – except maybe for the last two verses, as those are the ones that rhyme. Put in silly words, vocabulary words, new words, whatever! (Thanks Julie for the suggestion!)

Alphabet For Us from Mary K on Vimeo.

A is for Airplane, and B is for Bug,

C is for Cupcake, and D is for Dog,

E is for Eggplant, and F is for Fun,

And that’s the way the alphabet’s done.

G is for Gumdrop, and H is for House,

I is for Ice Cube, and J is for Jump,

K is for Kitchen, and L is for Land,

And that’s what makes the alphabet grand.

M is for Mushroom, and N is for Nose,

O is for Octopus, and P is for Pants,

Q is for Quiet, and R is for Run,

And that’s the way the alphabet’s done.

S is for Sandbox, and T is for Toes,

U is for Underwear, and V is for Vine,

W is for Walrus, and X is for Xantus (a kind of hummingbird),

And Y and Z end the alphabet for us.

Flannel Friday: Toot Toot Beep Beep by Emma Garcia

6 Jan

Hello Flannel Friday Friends!

Today I’ve got a flannelboard version of Emma Garcia’s Toot Toot Beep Beep. We’re doing a storytime about colors, and this is a GREAT toddler-appropriate book that talks about colors and vehicles and lets us make great noises like WHOOSH! and CHUGGA and, of course, BEEP. There are a number of excellent vocabulary words that mean “goes” – rushes, glides, trundles, hurtles, and more.

I made the vehicles very much emulating Garcia’s illustration style. Why mess with a great thing?

And here are the vehicles all tucked away for the night in the parking lot:

toot3

Please note my shout-out to the 60s-era camper van with the tie-dyed felt background on the green van.

I’m lucky enough to host the roundup today! So check back here on Saturday to see all the Flannel Friday goodness compiled in one place.

Happy flanneling!

Stories and More: Talk, Talk, Talk

30 Dec

Here’s what we did for Stories and More in October!

FOCUS: TALKING.

Talking and being spoken to is how children learn how language works. They need to hear and understand lots of different words in order to recognize them when they’re reading on their own. While children learn many unique words from hearing stories read aloud, they can also learn so much about language structure, how to make sounds, and, of course, lots of vocabulary words.

Storytime plan:

Opening song: Hello and How Are You?

Hello, hello, hello and how are you?

I’m fine, I’m fine, I hope that you are too!

Introductions and Early Literacy Reminder: Today we’re talking about talking. Hearing language is how we learn to speak. We learn words and how language works. Children need to know LOTS (tens of thousands) of words in order to become readers. The best ways to give them words? Talk to them and read to them!

Rhyme: Wake Up Toes

Wake Up Toes, wake up toes, wake up toes and wiggle, wiggle wiggle.

Wake up toes, wake up toes, wake up and wiggle in the morning!

Ask for suggestions for more body parts to wake up!

Early Literacy Reminder: Books with questions like this one are a great way to spark conversation! But you can make up your own conversation too – talk about the pictures and ask your own questions like “what do you think will happen next?”grow

Book: Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow? by Susan A. Shea

Flannelboard: Make a pig. The kids have to use lots of words for this one! They need to tell me which body part goes where, which parts are missing, and what I get wrong. It’s very much a conversation, and the kids drive it!

Active Rhyme: Can You Hop Like a Bunny?

Can you hop like a bunny? (hop)

Can you jump like a frog? (jump)

Can you waddle like a duck? (waddle)

Can you run like a dog? (run in place)

Can you fly like a bird? (flap arms)

Can you swim like a fish (swim)

Can you sit as still as can be?

As still as this? (sit down quietly)

We usually do this at least a couple of times.

Settling Rhyme: One Little Fish

One little fish is swimming in the water (put palms together and zig zag like a fish swimming)

Swimming in the water,

Swimming in the water,

One little fish is swimming in the water

Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble, POP! (raise hands and clap together on POP!)red

Book: Red Sled by Lita Judge

This is a great example of an “almost” wordless book. The story is told through the sounds and images. So we have to use those to figure out what the story is – we can tell our own story!

Fingerplay: Two Little Blackbirds

Two little blackbirds sitting on a hill (hold up two fingers)

One named Jack (move one finger) and one named Jill (move other finger)

Fly away Jack! (move finger behind back) Fly away Jill! (move other finger behind back)

Come back Jack! (bring finger back to front) Come back Jill! (move other finger back)

Repeat again using:

Sitting in the snow…fast, slow.

Sitting on a cloud…soft, loud.

Sitting on a gate…wobbly, straight.

Sitting on a lily…serious, silly.

I got some of these from Jbrary. Theirs has NINE verses!

Goodbye Rhyme: Our Hands Say Thank You

Early Literacy Play Activities:

Imaginative play is a great way to have a conversation and build language skills. I brought out a big tub of plastic food and dumped it on the floor. I put out paper plates and crayons, as well as a paper menu with checkboxes I made. The kids created plates of food they wanted to eat, talked to their grownups about what they liked, didn’t like, and hadn’t eaten, and otherwise made up their own play. It was very open-ended.

I also made a bunch of wordless books available for the caregiver and child to sit and look at and use to make up their own stories. I also put out some non-fiction books that had great pictures to talk about. I used titles like Pinkney’s The Lion and The Mouse, Idle’s Flora and the Flamingo, Miyares’ Float, Savage’s Where’s Walrus, and more.

Take-homes:

newsBooks: Babies took home a copy of At the Park, a black-and-white wordless book. Toddlers got a copy of Red Sled, and Preschoolers took home Good News, Bad News! by Jeff Mack. All books that can be talked about!

Activities: Babies took home a Brown Bear, Brown Bear box. At home it can become a mystery box – the caregiver puts and object inside, removes it with the child, and talks about it. A new item can appear in the box periodically.

Toddlers and Preschoolers took home a set of these animal faces that I made in Word and four craft sticks. They could color and cut out the faces at home and then tape or glue them on the sticks for instant puppets! My hope was the kids and caregivers would have a puppet show and make up stories together!

Here is the handout that went in the bags and includes more information on the books and activities and how to use them, plus additional ideas for home.

I hope this is useful! Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Stories and More: Movement and Motor Skills

17 Dec

In July I started a new position as an early literacy librarian for a suburban library district. One of the major parts of my job is facilitating a program called “Stories and More: Literacy to Go.” It’s kind of a storytime/literacy workshop hybrid,  for children aged 0 – 5 and their caregivers, and while I do a half hour storytime, I follow it with a half hour of activities targeted to build early literacy skills and do a LOT of modeling for caregivers. Additonally, at the end of the program, each child takes home a new book (often one we read in the storytime) and an activity to do at home to continue learning. I create a handout for the parents that explains the activity, how to share the book at home, and gives other examples of learning activities they can try at home. I also give titles of other similar books they may enjoy borrowing from the library.

Let me tell you: planning these programs is A LOT OF FUN. I do 9 sessions a month at branches throughout the system and many of them are fully attended (we do have registration in order to keep it from getting chaotic). I see close to 200 children each month! I am fortunate, also, that these programs are partially funded by our local Early Childhood Council, which affords me the funds to purchase books, and activities for all the children each month and to purchase materials for the activities.

I thought I’d start sharing my plans with y’all in hopes that you might find something useful! So here’s what we did in September:

FOCUS: MOVEMENT. FINE AND GROSS MOTOR. 

We know that fine motor skills are inextricably linked to learning to write. Children need the finger strength in order to hold a pencil! We also know that gross motor practice can help with things like memory, balance, coordination, and connecting both halves of the brain by “crossing the midline.” So I thought we could do a little of both in this Stories and More.

Storytime Plan:

Opening Song: Hello and How Are You?

Hello, hello, hello and how are you?

I’m fine, I’m fine, I hope that you are too!

Introductions and Early Literacy Reminder: Today we’re going to move our bodies, because movement and learning go together! Children learn with all their senses, and moving helps them recall what they’ve learned, hear the rhythm and rhyme in language, and much more!

Rhyme: Wake Up Toes

Wake Up Toes, wake up toes, wake up toes and wiggle, wiggle wiggle.

Wake up toes, wake up toes, wake up and wiggle in the morning!

We also wake up our hands, and then I ask the kids for suggestions of a couple more body parts to wake up. We’ve woken up our ears, nose, armpits, elbows, and most frequently, heads!

Song: Roly Poly (to the tune of Frere Jacques)

Roly poly, roly poly, (roll hands together)

Out out out! Out out out! (move hands out from each other)

Roly roly poly, roly roly poly (roll hands together)

In in in! In in in! (move hands towards each other)

Continue with up, down and fast, slow

Early Literacy Reminder: Doing the motions with the words up, down, out, in, fast and slow helps to reinforce the meaning of the words.rhythm

Book: I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison

Song: “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes” – regular speed, then faster, then slower, then fastest!

Settling rhyme: One Little Fish

One little fish is swimming in the water (put palms together and zig zag like a fish swimming)

Swimming in the water,

Swimming in the water,

One little fish is swimming in the water,

Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble, POP! (raise hands and clap together on POP!)

funBook: Is Everyone Ready for Fun? by Jan Thomas (we all get up and participate)

Movement song/Early Literacy Reminder: Sleeping Bunnies

This is a great song to help young people try self-regulation – which means controlling their actions – because they have to pretend to sleep until told it’s time to hop. It’s a tough skill to learn but important for when they start school!

Goodbye Rhyme: Our Hands Say Thank You

Our hand say thank you with a clap clap clap (clap hands)

Our feet say thank you with a tap, tap, tap (tap feet_

Clap clap clap

Tap tap tap

Turn around (turn around)

And take a bow! (take a bow)

Early Literacy Play Activities:

Gross motor: I got a set of these mats from Lakeshore. I put them on the floor and child and caregiver did the motions on each of the mats. If you’re unable to purchase the mats, put squares of different colored paper covered with clear tape. Write an action on each mat (print awareness!): Jump, squat, stand on one foot, run, crawl, etc.

Fine motor: Pompom sort. I taped colored construction paper to the bottoms of clear dip containers. I also taped paper around some old Crystal Lite containers a colleague had. I printed off and laminated some sorting mats like these. I offered a variety of tools to pick up the pompoms to go along with varying developmental levels: spoons, tweezers, “gator grabbers” (easier to open and close than the tweezers) and clothespins. The kids had a BLAST moving the pompoms around. Make sure you get BIGGER pompoms though, and remind parents to keep an eye on the littlest ones as these can be a choking hazard

Gross and fine motor for babies: Since my program reaches children 0 – 5 I didn’t want to leave the babies out! I taped bubble wrap to the wall for the little ones to lie on the floor and kick (gross motor!). I also put scarves in old kleenex boxes for the babies to grip and pull out (fine motor!). I had several parents comment that the would be recreating the kleenex box activity at home!

Take-homes: 

Books: Babies got a board book copy of Head, Shoulders Knees and Toes by Kubler. Toddlers took home the same title, but Mike Wohnoutka’s paperback version. The preschoolers got Thomas’s Is Everyone Ready for Fun? We purchased the board books from All About Books, and the other two through Scholastic’s Literacy Partners.

Activities: Babies and Toddlers got one of these sensory balls to use with movement. Preschoolers got the ingredients to make “animal action dice”: two wooden blocks and six farm animal stickers. I instructed parents to help their children put the stickers on one of the blocks and then write action words like “jump”, “skip”, etc. on the other. They were to roll the dice and do the action like the animal.

Here is the handout I included for parents which includes more information on each of these.

I hope some of this is useful! I will be posting additional months’ plans asap!

Flannel Friday: Hooray For Hat!

4 Nov

Wow, it’s been a super long time since my last FF post. Happy to be back, even temporarily!

I assume most, if not all, of you are familiar with the excellent book Hooray for Hat by Brian Won. It’s a perfect toddler book – fun story, colorful pictures, repeated refrain the kids can join in on reading, positive ending. Due to its simplicity and repetition, it makes for a great flannel board, too! But I must give credit where due – I got the idea from Laura at Library Lalaland (who’s post I found on the Flannel Friday Pinterest)

While Laura made her animals reversible (genius!) to show their grumpy and happy faces, I did not. I just kept their faces neutral. I also added a tiny piece of velcro to the back of each of the hats to help them stick together as one so it would be easier for me to handle.

Here are the animals, wearing their hats, sans Giraffe, who was still hiding in his tree feeling sad. Note I skipped turtle as I wanted to shorten the story a smidge because I do storytime for ages 0 – 5 and I get a lot of the younger crowd:

hooray-for-hat

And here’s Giraffe with all the hats. . HOORAY FOR FRIENDS!

hooray-for-hat3

Finally, I made a felt “Hooray for Hat” sign that I could put up the first time we say it and then point to each time. This helps with print recognition and children beginning to think of themselves as readers. I cut the letters out with my library’s die cut so I think they look super cute.

hooray-for-hat2

Hooray!

Today’s FF roundup will be hosted by Mollie Kay! Check out all this week’s awesome posts there!

“Soft Skills” and Storytime Part 1: Self Control

26 Mar

Recently, I was fortunate enough to hear Dr. Kimberlee Kiehl, Executive Director of the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center (the place where Smithsonian staff can send their kids!) speak about non-traditional learning opportunities in early childhood. The Center uses the museums as classrooms, and encourages children to learn by “building upon past knowledge and experience.” They focus less on rote learning and instead work to build executive function skills – the “soft skills” that allow us to learn and think and grow into successful humans. They include self-regulation (or self-control), critical thinking, perspective taking, problem solving, persistence, and more.

These skills are extremely important to a child’s development – as much or even more so than the ability to count, identify letters and colors, and other knowledge that we work to build in the early years. Dr. James Heckman, nobel prize-winning economist, and his colleagues studied these skills and found that they “predict success in life, that they causally produce that success, and that programs that enhance soft skills have an important place in an effective portfolio of public policies.” In other words, soft skills are a better predictor of a child growing into a successful adult than knowing one’s abc’s.

I’ve been thinking about how we help children develop these skills in the library – especially in storytime – and so I decided to write about each skill and what we can (and do) do in storytime to help children develop these skills. It’s yet another selling point for storytime as a great resource for parents and caregivers to help their children prepare for formal schooling.

The Harvard University Center on the Developing Child defines executive function and self regulation as:

the mental processes that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully. Just as an air traffic control system at a busy airport safely manages the arrivals and departures of many aircraft on multiple runways, the brain needs this skill set to filter distractions, prioritize tasks, set and achieve goals, and control impulses.

So, let’s talk about that last one: controlling impulses. Self-control. Self-regulation. Something I completely lack when faced with a bag of potato chips. And this kitty is exhibiting well:

bird

Self control includes the ability to pay attention, stay on task, regulate one’s body, and carefully look and listen, and sort information.

How do we develop help young children develop their self-control in storytime?

  • Ask them to try and sit and listen. We know they can’t do this for very long periods of time, but the more they practice, the better they get. We’re also asking them to focus on the task at hand – listening and paying attention to the book or activity
  • Ask them to keep their hands to themselves. That’s regulating one’s own body and not giving in to the impulse of putting their hands on their neighbor’s head/your flannelboard pieces/the puppet/whatever it is they really want to touch.
  • Ask them to answer questions about the book – especially when we’re asking them to look at the pictures and identify  objects or actions. If they have to find something on the page, I like to have them “use their words” to explain where it is, rather than pointing and saying “there!”. Vocabulary-building, y’all. 
  • Taking turns. It’s HARD for a young person to wait until it’s their turn to answer a question or put a piece on the flannel board. But we’re asking them to try, and they’re learning. 
  • Through movement activities, like a “freeze dance,” they’re having to regulate the movements of their bodies. Dancing requires them to figure out their place in space (proprioception!) compared to others and how to move themselves without bumping into others. If you’ve ever done the “Sleeping Bunnies” song and seen the storytime rug turn into a mosh pit, that’s your kids trying to figure out and regulate their bodies. 

As always, storytime is a great time to remind parents and caregivers how their children are developing not only cognitive skills but also these great soft skills. You might include soft skills in your early learning reminders/tips so everyone knows just how much learning is happening. 

I think this is also a great reminder to be patient with our young kids. They are learning, practicing, and figuring out their bodies and minds. 

How else do you encourage self-control in storytime? Please share! And look for part 2 of this series coming soon….

 

 

 

“We Wave Our Scarves Together” versión en español

11 Jan

My preschoolers and I, we LOVE scarf songs. Waving our scarves in the air is so much fun (gross motor skills!), along with trying to squish them up as small as possible and hide them in our hands (fine motor skills!). Scarf songs are a great way to get the wiggles out, build vocabulary and rhyming skills, and also develop those all-important fine and gross motor skills. Scarf songs FTW!

For my Spanish-speaking kids, I had been using the English version of “We Wave Our Scarves Together” (great jbrary video here to learn the tune) and just explaining the movement in Spanish before we sang. Today, though, I decided it wouldn’t be that hard to come up with a translation. So here it is: my quick-and-dirty translation that almost fits, syllabically (is that a word?).

“We Wave Our Scarves Together” versión en español

Agitamos los pañuelos, [we wave our scarves]

Agitamos los pañuelos.

Agitamos los pañuelos,

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

Agitámoslos arriba, [we wave them above]

Agitámoslos abajo. [we wave them below]

Agitámoslos en medio, [we wave them in the middle]

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

Tiramos los pañuelos, [we throw our scarves]

Tiramos los pañuelos.

Tiramos los pañuelos,

Porque es divertido. [because it’s fun]

 

Hope this is helpful to some of you!

 

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